We began stone grinding Nordic race skis over a quarter century ago in 1994. There is no substitute for the experience and refined work process we employ and our grinds have made podiums all over the world. 

When Tim retired and closed up the retail shop in 2017 he kept the grinder and relocated to a small workshop where the tradition of top quality race ski service continues as a fun hobby business for a retired guy.  We work on a limited seasonal schedule from November through early April.

Drop off and pickup logistics are facilitated by Contender Bicycles stores at their SLC and Park City locations.  Skis can also be shipped or dropped directly with prior arrangement.




 

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The Shop

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Why Grind Your Skis

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When to Grind

We work out of a 12x20 space housed in a friend's industrial building.  It's just big enough for our the grinder, hot box, ski racks and a couple work benches fabricated with Luan Mahogany plywood reclaimed from the old Third Ave store sign. 

The fine micro grooves (Structure) on the base of your ski interface with the snow surface and the ability of a ski to slide is greatly impacted by the type and condition of its base structure.  

 

Frequently a new ski's factory structure is inappropriate for local snow.  Base structures also abrade and wear out with use, get damaged from rocks or often seal up or swell from improper wax iron use.

 

Grinding the ski removes damaged material, imbeds a new, condition specific structure and flattens the base through the length and width of the ski resulting in better glide and improved wax retention. 

Obvious candidates are skis with rock damage, overheated spots that repel molten wax or have swollen or cratered bases that are no longer flat.

 

Next tier are skis with aggressive factory grinds that don't work in local snow or skis with good bases that have structures mismatched with the skis favored conditions - e.g. a cold profile camber ski with a warmer grind.

 

Last are skis with no obvious damage but lots of miles.  It's often stunning how much better a pair of "old favorites" perform with a fresh grind.  Scraping wax and skiing itself slowly remove small amounts of base material.  Over time the peaks of the structure micro shape erode and the ski slows down.